Where There’s a Will, There’s Not Always a Way

Wills may seem straightforward to produce, but they’re much more complex than one may think. Here are some common mistakes found in DIY wills:

  1. Critical information may be omitted.You may think that you’ve included all the necessary bits, but many things can easily slip by.
  2. No contingencies.Things can change, and your will needs to account for those possibilities. For example, a car that is supposed to go to your son is totaled in a car wreck.
  3. Lack of notarizationA notary public’s stamp and signature help protect against a will contest.
  4. It’s handwritten.This is known as a “holographic will” and is generally not allowed in New Mexico.
  5. It’s not witnessed. New Mexico law requires two individuals witness the signing of the will, and then sign it themselves.
  6. An internet template has been used but it is specific to another state.
  7. Ambiguous language.Ambiguity leads to dispute amongst those who are included in the will. Just as doctors use a specific vocabulary to speak to each other, attorneys use a precise, impossible-to-misconstrue legal language. You won’t be around to clarify once your will in enacted, so it is imperative that such language is used to ensure your will is carried out in accordance with your wishes.

Hiring a professional to write your will is essential in ensuring that it is used as intended. When you enlist our help to create your will, you’re not paying for pieces of paper; you’re paying for knowledge, advice, and peace of mind.


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